Day 6 of 12 Days Of Christmas - 6 Geese-A-Laying:

Ingredients you Need to be a Good Egg at work

As we approach the climax of the festive season (which has been building since October), boys and girls of all ages eagerly await to find out whether they've made this year's cut for Santa's nice list.

Now while you might think that your suit and tie makes you exempt from Santa's stringent naughty and nice criteria, the daily grind professionals are just as susceptible to receiving a lump of coal in their Christmas stocking as their tireless toddlers.


So have you been a good egg this year or would Willy Wonka's Eggdicator plummet you into the furnace in typical Veruca Salt style?

Self Motivated

A good employee doesn't need a Christmas bonus or the promise of some magic beans to get out of bed in the morning and can instead rely on their innate drive and personal motivation. Whether it derives from a passion for the job or they're working towards a long term goal, the best staff are pre-programmed to succeed and usually set the standards surrounded by an office of 9 to 5 zombies. As much as they would like to, managers can't spend every second of the day micromanaging staff and need to be able to trust that the office won't turn into the cast of Gremlins the moment their back is turned.

Good Communicator

Whether you're required to liaise with multiple departments or your only focus is on the customer, it's fair to say the Charlie Chaplin would have struggled to get a job in a world of constant communication. An exemplary employee has come a long way since a cup on a string and is able to express themselves confidently and clearly, regardless of who they're conversing with. Being a good communicator works both ways though and those who effectively walk around with their fingers in their ears would hear some less than merry four letter words directed at them.if only they were listening.

Team Player

Though more than comfortable being left to their own devices, a good egg doesn't crack when having to work in a team of perhaps a dozen (those jokes were eggcellent.). You might not always agree with your colleagues inexcusable views on office adhesives or models of swivel chair, but a good employee will put all personal conflicts to one side in order to be successful on a project. They need to be confident enough to contribute ideas but also be receptive to others, regardless of how ridiculous their team name suggestion of 'Decadence' is.

Always Learning

They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks, but unless your line of work requires you to play dead or balance a ball on your nose, I don't think this old adage applies. Those trying to rise to the top of their profession need to be up to date with everything that's happening in their industry from current trends to new innovations. Likewise, a good employee should always be looking at ways in which they can add to their portfolio of skills (although I don't think this includes line-dancing).

Flexible

Not too dissimilar to the entry requirements of a travelling circus, flexibility is one of the key skills that employers value in their workforce. Although they probably won't be expected to put their legs behind their head or fit into a jam jar, a good employee is able to adapt to new pressures and demands and thrive outside of their comfort zone. If you're constantly refusing to take on jobs that aren't part of your remit, then I recommend you ask Santa for a yoga mat this Christmas.



The end of the year is a time for reflection and if you think you've ticked most of the above, then be rest assured that your boss has informed the necessary elves and Father Christmas will be made aware of your efforts. However if you're thinking that there should be a 'none of the above' box, then it's time to change your attitude straight away or risk facing a visit from the ghosts of unemployment past, present and yet to come.

He knows if you've been bad or good so be a good egg for goodness sakes!