Tea vs Coffee Drinkers: who are the better workers?

Though they hardly draw up the film noir image of silhouettes and dodgy deals, tea & coffee's status as the UK's favourite legal 'high' has forever been proclaimed by Nes-caffeine purveyors and 'expert' leaf readers *cough cough*.

Now while these steaming cups of willpower have been long time sponsors of the rat race, tea and coffee drinkers will frequently debate the benefits of their chosen elixir, often quoting the health and mental rewards that best prepare them for success.

The almost magical properties of these beverages can leave people ready to take on ambitions far beyond the office walls, but is it the leaf or bean consumers that make the best workers?

Tea Drinkers

Presumably discovered by mythical Asian dragons, long before dinosaurs and Bruce Forsyth, the benefits of drinking tea have been much documented for centuries. Though it was once reserved for tea rooms, monarchy and again Bruce Forsyth, the UK's national drink has been fuelling productivity and conversation since its introduction to these isles in the 1600s.

Tea is associated with the more laid-back and assured worker, and though perhaps thought of more as a relaxant than a stimulator (which it is), tea offers a more focused and manageable boost than its Ethiopian born, American adopted cousin Joe. At about 40mgs, a cup of tea has around half the caffeine of filter coffee and acts as an effective cognitive enhancer but without the post sip jitters.

It also seems that the sacred tea bag is more effective than Calpol for curing what ails you. Full of polyphenols and antioxidants, studies suggest that heart disease, alzheimer's and even cancer can be inexplainably deterred by a simple pot of camomile and a jammy scone.

Furthermore, if Japan has taught us anything, it's that tea can lead to a longer life and younger looking skin and that black is slimming on even the fullest figure of ninjas.  

Coffee Drinkers

Stereotypically the more energetic and dynamic (and sometime obnoxious) of colleagues, the coffee drinkers will usually be dead to the world until after their first cup of CostaNeroBucks. Coffee is quickly gaining on tea in the popularity stakes, largely due to the high street latte mega chains that were once the churches of hipsters and bluetooth go-getters.

Your typical cup of coffee can have more than 70mgs of caffeine and once you're on your third or fourth brew, you'll be spinning around the office in a Taz inspired frenzy. Providing you can reign this in, this increased alertness tops that of the tea lovers and can result in increased productivity and performance. This buzz can see the in-tray wiped out by lunchtime, but tempts the likelihood of burnout and espresso dependency as the day goes on.

Some scientists have also suggested that coffee can fight the risk of diabetes, stroke and Parkinson's disease. Another great beneficiary of coffee seems to be the hippocampus with the improvement and longevity of memory reported from some studies. Finally, a magic potion to remember whose is the mystery hummus in the back of the fridge.

While the energy drinkers are speaking in tongues, the bean and leafers are reaping the benefits from their more natural of drink choices. Though both have their reported and reputed health rewards, which one you choose will depend on personal taste and of course, who's doing the rounds. As for who makes the better workers, did you really think I'd state a winner between tea and coffee drinkers? I'm not here to start WW3. Ciao.